Why Hire a Veteran?

So why hire a veteran?

Hire Heroes USA’s Noah Thomas thinks the question should be “Why wouldn’t you hire a veteran?”

Thomas was at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in November helping put on a USO/Hire Heroes USA Transition Workshop when he stopped to talk with us about why potential employers should look to hire recent veterans.

“No matter if you’ve served two years, six months, 20 years, 30 years, a veteran has experienced a lot,” he said. “They’re resilient, they’re objective-oriented, they’re detail-oriented.

“They know how to work in diverse teams. And so what they can bring to the company is far beyond what you see on TV and movies with the [post-traumatic stress issues].

“[Veterans] bring everything from project planning, logistics, community engagement and they do it in a short timeframe and usually with not a lot of money.”

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Whether you’re a transitioning service member in need of a resume or a boost to your interview skills or an employer looking for some fresh talent, you can accomplish a lot at a USO/Hire Heroes USA workshop.

Auburn vs. Alabama Off the Field: Schools’ Theta Chi Chapters Compete to Support the USO

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Roll Tide? War Eagle? Now is your chance to support your favorite school and help the USO at the same time.

The famous SEC football foes have extended their rivalry to the nonprofit world. According to al.com, the Theta Chi chapters at both Auburn and the University of Alabama have created a competition to benefit the USO.

Participation is easy, and any fan around the world can do it. You can text either “USO Tide” if you support Alabama or “USO Tigers” if you support Auburn to 80888. The texts will add a $5 donation to your phone bill that will benefit the USO. (Standard text and data rates may also apply.)

Alabama senior John Anderson, a former Theta Chi chapter president, told al.com that the two chapters set a goal to raise $10,000 for the USO.

“We figured since college students are always on their phones, this would be an easy way for them to donate to a great organization,” Anderson told al.com. “However, we have also found that parents and other adults are just as willing to donate via a text message.”

Messages from the Front: See What Troops Told the USO About Being Away for the Holidays

It’s hard for civilians to be away from home for the holidays. Now imagine serving in a war zone.

Friend of the USO Eric Raum traveled to the Mideast to talk to troops about what its like to be missing their families during the holidays. He also profiled how the USO gives those troops a little piece of home during a tough time through the USO Holidays for Heroes program.

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A Moment Amid a Milestone: USO and What to Expect Creates a Big Day for Military Moms in the D.C. Area

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SPRINGFIELD, Virginia–Sometimes in life’s biggest moments, it’s the little things that matter most.

Military moms are often far away from family and friends during their pregnancies. Knowing this, the USO and the What to Expect Foundation partner to host Special Delivery baby showers to give these moms a moment of appreciation.

This week, more than 100 new moms and moms-to-be attended Special Delivery baby showers for the Fort Belvoir, Virginia, and Fort Meade, Maryland, military communities.

“It means a lot [to be here],” said Tanya Gehrig at one of this week’s baby showers. Gehrig is a Navy spouse and a proud mom of two sons, including one who was born just 12 days ago. “At this table, I was really able to meet some ladies that I could connect with. It was nice to just meet all of these people.”

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Army Maj. Mia Bruner, who is expecting her third child, said she was excited to participate in the event.

“Actually, when I was pregnant with my second child, I saw that they invited pregnant soldiers to these baby showers and really wished I could have attended then,” she said. “I was really happy when I was chosen for this event with this pregnancy.”

Special Delivery attendees enjoyed baby shower games, lunch and baby item raffles. Toward the end of the event, best-selling “What to Expect When You’re Expecting” series author Heidi Murkoff held a candid Q&A, giving advice and tips on topics from pregnancy through a child’s first years. Murkoff even recognized moms in the audience she’d met through the “What to Expect” Facebook page. Murkoff concluded the event with a meet and greet and book signing for the moms in attendance.

The new moms also left with gift bags that included hygiene items for their babies and a storybook. It may not have seemed like a lot, but it made a huge difference to attendees.

“I feel like I should have known that I would need items, but at these events, even the little things help,” Gehrig said. “Some people got big things like strollers and Pack’N Plays [through the raffles], but it means a lot to get a little bottle of lotion and shampoo. It’s one less thing I have to worry about when I am running out to the store. That stuff means a lot to me.”

–By Jessica Battaglia

Retired National Guard Colonel Gives to the USO for His Two Veteran Sons

Hal Harrington is a retired Army National Guard colonel currently working for the federal government. He has two sons — one officer and one enlisted — who both deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan.

When it came time to give to the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) this year, his choice of charity was clear.

“I’m always critical, you know, of charity organizations,” said Harrington, who served more than 30 years in the Michigan National Guard, the same organization in which his sons served. “The USO is one I don’t even have to think about. In fact, when I sent my boys off to their basic schools, the USO was part of my safety brief to them. I’d say, ‘Here’s where you’re flying and here’s where you’re going, and here’s the airports that have USO facilities, so stop in and use them.’”

After Harrington retired from the Michigan National Guard, he worked in the private sector for several decades until the economy took a dip in the late 2000s. That’s when he took a job working for the federal government once again, and he was happy to see the CFC had evolved to make giving much easier.

“I’d get those things in the mail for the USO and I donated that way,” Harrington said. “But the CFC made it really easy to give to the organizations I already gave to.”

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The CFC is the world’s largest and most successful annual workplace charity campaign. Pledges made by federal civilian and military personnel during the campaign season (Sept. 1 to Dec. 15) bring in millions of dollars to support nonprofit organizations that provide health and human service benefits throughout the world.

“My hat is off to [the USO] for doing what [it does],” Harrington said. “You go into those airports and sometimes there are two people there and sometimes there’s 10, and sometimes there’s 30 with duffel bags waiting to go. It doesn’t matter what airport you’re in — Atlanta, Denver, Durham … — there’s always service people and there’s always the USO where we know they are being taken care of.”

“If I can support them in any way, shape or form through [the USO] I will — and I do.”

The USO is CFC #11381.