This Week’s Snag Film: Inside the Pentagon

National Geographic gives you ‘’Top Secret’’ access to the nerve center of the U.S. Military. From its frenzied construction during the height of World War II to the terrorist attacks of September 11 and the ensuing war on terrorism, get an intimate view of the history and intrigue of the headquarters for the United States Military. INSIDE THE PENTAGON is a fascinating, intimate view of the Pentagon’s triumphs, defeats, and challenges.

Remember: you can watch great documentaries like this online any time you want and for FREE from Snag Films.  Let us know what you think!

 

This Week’s Snag Film: Inside Shock and Awe

This week’s FREE documentary from Snag Films looks back at the beginning of Operation Iraqi Freedom, and serves as a prescient reminder of the service and sacrifice of our military as we welcome home the combat Troops who served.

For the first time, get a detailed inside look at what happened during the Shock and Awe bombing campaign that launched Operation Iraqi Freedom. Using spectacular exclusive imagery, CGI and powerful survivor interviews, National Geographic investigates the planning, execution and outcome of the most intense bombardment in history—putting it into the context of history’s most dramatic bombardments and providing an inside look at what was going on in Baghdad at the time.

Get an insider’s view of the technology that allows overwhelming firepower to be accurately targeted and learn how exotic missiles, like the thermo baric ‘’bunker busters’’ work. And explore the latest weaponry that may change the future of warfare. Includes Special Bonus Program: Warship.

This Week’s Snag Film: National Geographic’s Shark Encounters

The ultra-rare, deepwater "Megamouth" shark was captured on film for the first time ever in National Geographic's Shark Encounters. This, however, is a whale shark.

Plunge into the ocean with renowned filmmaker and shark expert Michael deGruy as he takes you to the underwater realm of sharks for this week’s USO Theater offering from Snag Films.  Remember: Snag Films are always free and you can share them with friends and family  - no matter where they are around the world!  We’re continuing to bring you the best in documentary film making and if YOU have films you’d like to see, let us know in the comments section.

In the meantime, we hope you’ll plunge into the ocean depths with renowned filmmaker and shark expert Michael deGruy as he takes you to the underwater realm of sharks! You’ll swim terrifyingly close to see these efficient predators in action, and watch in fear as deGruy re-enacts a shark attack that cost him part of an arm fourteen years earlier. You’ll also discover the incredible physical and behavioral diversity of the shark family, from the 7-inch dwarf dog shark to the over 50-foot whale shark. Through spectacular animation, enter a shark’s body to learn how it hones in on its prey using its unique sense of electro-reception. And join in the discovery of a gigantic deepwater species known as “Megamouth,” with the first ever close-up footage.


more about “Browse Section: USO Theater“, posted with vodpod

Operation Denali’s Marc Hoffmeister named “Adventurer of the Year”

From the desk of Jeremy Borden, USO Staff Writer:

Army Lieutenant Colonel Marc Hoffmeister says his whole experience with National Geographic has been one surprise after the other. But none was bigger than learning that he’d tied for first place as the organization’s Adventurer of the Year.

Hoffmeister, who was wounded in a roadside blast in Iraq in 2007, organized a group of wounded warriors to climb Mount McKinley, also known as Denali, the highest mountain peak in North America in June 2009.

Lieutenant Colonel Marc Hoffmeister summits Denali. DoD photo.

He said he was more than a little shocked to be named one of the magazine’s Adventurers of the Year. “I frankly was pretty surprised to even be ranked amongst them,” he said from his home in Eagle River, Alaska.

It also shocked him that readers honored him as their Readers’ Choice Adventurer of the Year on Thursday.

He credits his team — the accomplishment is a group one, he says — but can’t put his finger on what put his story above the rest. “I don’t know what singled us out at all,” he said.

Hoffmeister went up against accomplished adventurers, like the astronaut known as “the Hubble repairman,” and tied for first place in the readers’ choice contest with Albert Yu-Min Lin, who organized a treacherous expedition into Mongolia to search for the lost tomb of Genghis Khan.

As Hoffmeister and Lin pulled away from the pack in the competition’s last weeks, the soldier wondered what his chances were.

“It’s the modern age of technology. You ‘Google’ the competition,” Hoffmeister said.

When he found out about Lin’s University of California-San Diego connections, he joked he was worried that “[Lin’s] got the whole school at his disposal. Can’t you just [take students] to the computer lab every other day and vote?”

Despite what he considered steep odds, Hoffmeister organized and assembled his own social network. Army officials and even senators gravitated to his story, helping put the word out through e-mail chains, news stories and social media Web sites. Hoffmeister knew it was working when he started hearing from long lost friends.

But it was Hoffmeister’s story of four wounded warriors training for a year and spending a month summiting a treacherous peak that resonated around the country. When Hoffmeister was beginning his own recovery, he knew the mountain climb could change wounded warriors’ lives. But first, he had his own burdens to over come…Read the full blog post from “On the Frontlines” and see Army Lieutenant Colonel Marc Hoffmeister’s full story online at ON★PATROL, the magazine of the USO.

Vote Marc Hoffmeister for National Geographic Explorer of the Year!

Each year, National Geographic names an “Explorer of the Year,” and for the first time ever, YOU get to decide!  We highly recommend Marc Hoffmeister, a U.S. Army veteran and leader of Operation Denali.

Army Lt. Col. Marc Hoffmeister is among four wounded warriors who are attempting to summit Alaska's Mount McKinley, also known as Denali, the highest point in North America, June 1, 2009. U.S. Army photo

From his profile in National Geographic: “On June 1, 2009, a team of five men and one woman flew in to the Kahiltna Glacier at the base of Denali. Besides Marc and Gayle Hoffmeister and a longtime able-bodied friend of Marc’s, Bob Haines, the party included three other Iraq veterans: Jon Kuniholm, an ex-Marine who’d lost an arm to an IED; Matt Nyman, an Army Ranger whose leg had to be amputated after his chopper was shot down; and David Shebib, an Army combat medic who’d suffered severe head and chest injuries after stepping on an IED.”

Hoffmeister’s courage and bravery – combined with a can-do spirit and sense of adventure – make him the perfect candidate for Explorer of the Year!  He has this to say about the experience, “We are thrilled to be honored among an amazing group of people.  The only disappointment of this recognition is that it is an individual award. I truly feel this is and should be a team recognition.  Every member of our team poured their heart and soul in to the effort.  They made it happen and their inspirational example continues to impact wounded warrior’s like us every day.”

Click here to vote for Hoffmeister in the Reader’s Choice Poll and watch a video Operation Denali below!  Winners will be announced later on this year.