New York Jets Pay Tribute to Our Troops

The American flag is unfurled over the field during the National Anthem. (Photo by Brian Anthony Price)

By Brian Anthony Price

The New York Jets kicked off Monday Night Football with a tough 10-9 loss to the Baltimore Ravens. However, the team scored big with our servicemen and women.

Prior to the game, over 200 troops from all four branches unfurled a massive American flag over the new football field.

It was a proud moment for Jets owner, Woody Johnson: “We’ve got a B-52 bomber flying over the stadium during the National Anthem. We’re extending a flag over the entire field. We’ve invited hundreds of soldiers to be in attendance at the game. We want everybody to know how much we love and support our soldiers.”

Johnson showed his personal support by spending time with the evening’s honorees. DCCS Frank Ferrantelli of the USS New York was among them. “I’m honored to be here as this is my first ever live Jets game. To be welcomed personally by the owner? That’s something I’ll never forget.” Ferrantelli hails from Staten Island and describes himself as life-long, die-hard Jet fan.

Jets owner Woody Johnson with DCCS Ferrantelli. (Photo by Brian Anthony Price)

The feeling is mutual. “Having just honored the anniversary of 9/11 we wanted to do something special,” said  Fullback Tony Richardson, whose father served in Viet Nam and sister is on active duty. “The pre-game ceremony was very emotional and touched a lot of players’ hearts. Honoring our troops puts things in perspective and helps us to appreciate everything we have as Americans.”

Fellow fullback and rookie sensation John “The Terminator” Connor added: “Being part of such a patriotic celebration was a dream come true. I dreamed of growing up and having a chance to honor people who have served. It was a very special moment for me to also honor the fallen of 9/11 as a player in New York.“

The Jets will be saluting the military throughout the season under Johnson’s direction: “We’re at war and everything we do is about our warriors in combat. Our identity, not as athletes, not as Jets, not as people in the NFL, but as Americans, is (reflected in) our troops. We are who we are because our liberties are protected by men and women fighting for us all over the world.”

Special thanks to Robert Mastroddi, Bruce Speight and the entire Jets organization and front office.

The Washington Redskins Welcome Servicemen to Training Camp

SPC Bradshaw is flanked by backs Clinton Portis (L) and Mike Sellers (R). (Photo credit: Pam Chvotkin)

By Brian Anthony Price/Special to the USO

On a miserable, gray Sunday last week, thousands of loyal Skins fans came out for open practice. They were back early Monday morning to watch in the blazing sun. Rain or shine, a sizable number of these fans were men and women from the armed services, who just can never get enough of Redskins football.

One of them, Specialist (SPC) Robert Bradshaw recently returned from a one-year tour in Afghanistan after having completed over 400 missions. Bradshaw came back to his native D.C. on Saturday August 14th. The next day, he was front and center at Redskins training camp: “This is the first thing I wanted to do, see my Redskins up close. Being here is just awesome.”

Turns out, Bradshaw was hoping to meet running back, Clinton Portis. So Zach Bolno, the Redskin’s former Executive Director of Communications, set a plan in motion. As he left the field, Portis was directed to Bradshaw and headed right over: “I hear you just got back from combat. Here, I gotta’ give these to you.” Portis handed the young soldier his workout gloves and sweatbands and signed all 20 of his football cards.

Fullback Mike Sellers was waiting on deck to join them and after the two players posed with Bradshaw for pictures, they thanked him for his service.

Sellers reminisced about growing up the son of an Army man: “My Dad was extremely strict. I always had a curfew, but it helped get me to where I’m at right now. Hard work, perseverance and never quitting: that’s what my Dad taught me.” He added that having a devoted and local fan base of military families and veterans “is a motivation that a lot of other teams don’t have.”

Other teammates agree. Linebacker Rocky McIntosh, whose father is an active service member, visited Elgin Air Force Base [near Valparaiso, Florida] and challenged some of the troops to a fitness contest. “They kicked my butt. From push-ups to sit-ups to pull-ups, they tore me up. I was still in the offseason, but they’re up bright and early training every day. I didn’t stand a chance!”

LB London Fletcher signs autographs for members of the U.S.M.C. (PC: Pam Chvotkin)

Guard Derrick Dockery is another player with family ties: “My father-in- law is a retired colonel and was deployed to Iraq several times. The troops are people near and dear to my heart.”

The Army wasn’t the only branch of the military represented at Redskins camp. The front office invited several active members of the United States Marine Corps out to camp that day. Sgt. Allen Waggoner was one of them. He’s been to Iraq twice and is planning on going back for a third tour. When asked why, his response was simple: “We reenlist. It’s what we do.”

The mutual respect between the Redskins players and the troops is a continual source of inspiration to both.

“They’ll leave [camp today] happy to have met a football player. I’ll leave just as happy having met people who have served,” said veteran linebacker, London Fletcher.

Since joining the Redskins, linebacker Lorenzo Alexander has spent time visiting with wounded soldiers at Walter Reed. “We enjoy going out to Walter Reed every year, giving back, and showing the troops our support. We have a lot of Redskins fans in the military. I love hanging out with them.” He added some thoughts about the team and the upcoming season. “There’s a lot of optimism and there’s a whole new vibe. We know the troops are watching and we want to get some wins for them.”

Shout Outs

Trent Williams, OT: “It takes a real man or woman to stand up and fight for our freedom. Be careful, God bless and come home safe.”

Andre Carter, DE: “Everything the troops do has not been forgotten. Now hurry up and home come safe. We love you and God bless.”

From Maury Povich, who was a special guest at training camp on Monday: “We have it good in this country and the reason for that is what everybody is doing for us overseas in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other places where there are threats. Anybody who is an American understands exactly what their protection means and we’re all so grateful to our troops. I want to thank them dearly.”

Special thank you to Matt Taylor, Zach Bolno, Angela Alsano, the entire Redskins organization and front office and photographer Pam Chvotkin.

Washington Nationals and USO Kick Off ‘Me & a Friend’ Program for Kids

By Brian Price

Our nation’s “Patriot Six” culminates this July 4th weekend, but appreciation for our troops and their families will continue throughout the baseball season. The Washington Nationals, in conjunction with the USO of Metropolitan Washington, have started a new program that provides military kids free tickets to Sunday’s game when star pitcher, Stephen Strasburg, takes the mound. The Nationals will provide free tickets to thousands of young fans throughout the rest of the season.

Craig Stammen chats with USO Vice President Kevin Wensing (r).

USO Vice President Kevin Wensing is especially pleased that the Nationals have taken this initiative. “We hope this is just the beginning and that other pro teams take a page out of the Nationals’ book and get involved with military family and friends across the country,”

In anticipation of Sunday’s festivities, Nationals players and their manager, Jim Riggleman, offered their thoughts on the meaning of the holiday and the military families who will be coming out to the ballpark.

BP: What does the “Me & a Friend” Program mean to you?

Jim Riggleman: “I’m so proud of every soldier for defending us. I think what the troops do is the most important thing that anybody can do for his country. Playing baseball pales in comparison to what the troops do. We provide entertainment. However, I’m honored that we can be the first team to get ‘Me and a Friend’ started. For a young person to have a loved one in combat is an unimaginably difficult thing. If baseball can give them a few moments of comfort than that’s more satisfying than anything I can think of. I’m excited for them to come out to the ballpark.”

BP: What’s special about playing in our nation’s capital?

Ryan Zimmerman, 3B, #11: “Washington D.C. is a great patriotic city to live in and play baseball in, especially during July 4th weekend. We play within view of the capital building, which is a special thing. We’re always trying to do things to stay connected to the troops and to show our appreciation. I know the whole club is really excited to kick off the ‘Me and a Friend’ program. Everyday we’re thankful for what our troops do. We live in a great country.”

J.D. Martin, SP, #51: “One of my favorite moments each home game is when we welcome home troops [in the 3rd inning]. They get put up on the jumbo screen and they always receive a standing ovation. It’s great getting a chance to acknowledge them.”

BP: What does this holiday mean to you?

Craig Stammen, SP, #35: “The only reason I’m able to do what I do is because of the troops. For most Americans July 4th means fireworks and barbeques, but it’s like any other day for a soldier in that they’re still risking their lives for the independence that we civilians are celebrating. I appreciate all soldiers and can’t thank them enough.”

(L to R) Nyjer Morgan, Ryan Zimmerman, Josh Willingham, and Adam Dunn observe the National Anthem.

BP: Do you have any friends in the service?

Riggleman: “I just returned a letter to a veteran who was a ball boy for me when I was managing in the minors. He served in the U.S. Marines for 20 years. His first passion in life was serving this country. His second is baseball, so after having served he’s back and I’m trying to help find him a job in baseball.”

Stammen: “My college roommate enlisted in Officer Candidate School about two years ago. After, he spent a year in Afghanistan and now he’s at Fort Bragg in North Carolina. I try to speak with him as often as I can and keep him close to my heart.”

“The thing about him, and really any soldier, is that they’ll never let on to how tough it is in combat. We’ll play on a hot day and the first thing we do after the game is shower. He’s in combat, it’s 40 degrees hotter and he might not be able to shower for days at a time.”

Martin: “A good family friend, Mike Hill, was in Iraq and he was responding to a roadside bomb. He was helping to pick up a wounded soldier on a stretcher when a landmine went off. It killed several troops around him and he was seriously injured. I’m from a small town, so that’s something that everybody heard about. We were just glad he made it out alive.”

Jim Riggleman summed up perfectly: “Our troops provide safety for us and some of them don’t come back. As Americans, that’s something we need to always appreciate especially when we’re celebrating our independence. Freedom’s not free and they’re the ones paying the price.”

The Washington Nationals and the USO of Metropolitan Washington have teamed up to give military kids the opportunity to enjoy a baseball game with their friends through the “Me and a Friend” program, which formally kicks off on July 4 when the Nationals host the New York Mets in Washington, D.C at 1:35 p.m..

Tickets for the July 4th game are available on a first come first serve basis through USO-Metro’s TicketLine program and must be picked up at the USO office at 228 McNair Road Bldg 405 Fort Myer, VA 22211.  Military families can also visit http://www.usometro.org/tickets to check on availability.

New York Giants Salute Our Troops

In honor of our nation’s “Patriot Six” the New York Giants invited the USO out to training camp to spend time with players, several of whom had personal ties to the armed forces. In fact, head coach Tom Coughlin traveled to the Persian Gulf just last year as part of the inaugural NFL-USO Coaches Tour.  Correspondent Brian Price spoke with players who expressed their appreciation for the troops, the meaning of patriotism and their excitement to begin a new NFL season.

Brian Price: When do you feel most patriotic?

Corey Webster, #23, CB: Before the game: the American flags are waving, the National Anthem is being sung and especially when a plane flies over the stadium. It’s a brilliant moment. We share the same colors as our country: red, white and blue, so I also feel patriotic whenever I put on my Giants uniform.

BP: Tell me about this team’s relationship with Lt. Col Gadson.

CW: Lt. Col Greg Gadson is tight with Coach [Mike] Sully. They played football at Army together.

Editor’s Note: Mike Sullivan is currently the Giants’ quarterbacks coach. Coach Sullivan is a graduate of the U.S. Army Airborne, Ranger and Air Assault schools. He was also a defensive back at Army. Lt. Col Gadson was an honorary Giants co-captain during their 2008 run to the Super Bowl.

Gadson’s platoon was attacked and he lost his legs. He’s a tremendous motivational speaker and he was key in inspiring us during our Super Bowl run. Lt. Col Gadson spoke to us about the importance of being team oriented. Have trust in the person next to you and you’ll succeed.

Giant's Quarterback Eli Manning and Tackle Kareem McKenzie - with Price - show their appreciation for the USO. (USO Photo by Julian Smith)

BP: Your team’s play, particularly during the 2008 Super Bowl, inspires thousands of troops.

Eli Manning, #10, QB: That means a lot. We play football for a lot of reasons, but when I hear something like that, about troops staying up late to watch our games on satellite overseas, that is a huge motivational factor. The fact that these guys have so much courage and are cheering for us always makes us want to go out and give them a great show.

I’m proud to be in this country with a chance to play football because of soldiers who, over the course of history have, and continue to, make unimaginable sacrifices.

Thank you for everything. We’re rooting for you. You have the Giants support 100%. We’re grateful for everything you do for this country. Get home soon.

BP: What did you learn from your recent USO trip to Iraq?

Shaun O’ Hara, #60, C: First and foremost, I was struck by the sheer magnitude of our overseas operation. I also got a sense of the troops feelings: they knew they were doing the right thing by being over there. They believed in the job at hand and they were happy to do it. That was really inspiring to witness. It’s what they had trained for and they were all excited to take part.

BP: What was your schedule like?

SO’H: The main goal was to hit as many places and meet as many troops as possible. We got to spend time with General Odierno and attend one of his daily briefings, which was great. We also had dinner with him at one of Saddam’s palaces at Camp Victory in Baghdad. We were on the tour to show our appreciation, but there wasn’t a soldier that we met who wasn’t thanking us. We wanted to reassure them that they were our heroes.

Price spoke with Giants captain Shaun O' Hara about his recent USO tour to Kuwait and Iraq. (USO Photo by Joanna Levine)

BP: Any surprises?

SO’H: I think it’s important for the American public to know how much we’re helping the Iraqi military. I hadn’t previously realized how hard our troops are working to help them so when our forces leave in 2011, they’ll be able to sustain peace on their own. There are a lot of Iraqi people who embrace our presence and are happy we’re there. We’ve freed them from Saddam Hussein and his reign. They’re a proud country, a proud people and they’re eager for a chance to flourish.

Editor’s Note: O’Hara was joined on the tour by Bears cornerback Charles Tillman.

BP: As a NFL veteran, what’s your advice for young people?

Kareem McKenzie, #67, T: In football, pay as much attention as possible to the older guys who have done it for years. Have a sense of what it takes to be successful. It’s not luck that somebody plays in the league for 10 or 11 years. We’ve worked hard to maintain consistency. Take notice of an older guy’s work ethic. Make a note of how many hours they put into perfecting their craft.

For troops, however, it’s on a totally different level. The mental focus one needs to have to operate in the conditions they do is unbelievable. Wearing body armor in 120-130 degree heat is something that really struck me. You can’t praise them enough.

I’m close with several veterans of various wars and my relationship with them provides a tremendous sense of personal pride. It’s a special thing to know somebody who has served.

On behalf of all NFL players, the support staff, and the entire New York Giants organization, we appreciate everything you do and your dedication to serving this country. We have you in our prayers for a safe return.

BP: Any message for the troops?

Michael Boley, #59, LB: I want to offer a big thank you to our troops. My brother spent seven months over in Afghanistan. Whenever I speak with him he always emphasizes that we shouldn’t take anything for granted. It’s important to appreciate the liberties we as citizens have in this country. What the troops do is more than we ever see on the news.

Chris Canty, #99, DT: Sometimes people can take their freedom for granted, but we always need to be thankful that we have the opportunity to live in America and be free. I’m able to play football because of the dedication of the men and women of the armed forces who protect this country. I understand the dedication and teamwork it takes for us to be successful, but if we fail it’s only wins and losses. If they fail it’s life and death. They’re risking their lives for me and they don’t even know me. You have to have tremendous respect for that kind of dedication.

Dave Tollefson, #71, DE: They inspire me. We’re playing a game every weekend and they’re putting their lives on the line everyday to keep America free and safe so we can sleep at night.

BP: Your brother served this country, right?

DT: My brother, Brett Baatrup, was in the First Tank Battalion at 29 Palms, U.S. Marine Core. He just finished his second tour.

BP: What do you learn from him about the nature of service and combat?

DT: I’ll think I had a rough day at practice and then he’ll tell me about his day: One time his tank treads fell off in the middle of a battle and he had to get out of the tank to put them back on. You want to talk about rough? You want to talk about pressure to perform? Try being responsible for fellow troops lives in a situation like that. That’s not just him. That’s the case for every soldier. I still ask him all the time: “How’d you do it?”

BP: What’s his answer?

DT: “I had to. It’s my job.” Look, I hate making correlations to what we do and what they do. A coach tells me to do something and I do it because I can’t let my team down. It was the same with my brother, obviously magnified a million times over, but it wasn’t about the orders. It was about, as a group, completing a mission and keeping everybody safe.

BP: Did you ever think you’d be doing a job that inspires the bravest people on earth?

David Diehl, #66, T: It’s awesome to be in this position with that in mind. If our play can, at least for a few moments, ease some stress for the troops and help boost morale than that’s what it’s all about for us. I love hearing about troops watching the games overseas and how they organize games against other platoons. As players we get a chance to meet and spend time with the troops and they tell us: “You’re our heroes.” To which we answer right back: “You soldiers are our heroes.”

Many thanks to E. Peter John Baptiste, Pat Hanlon and the entire Giants organization and front office for their assistance with this piece.

Editor’s Note: In addition to supporting the USO and American troops, the Giants are active in many charities and initiatives including finding a cure for Cystic Fibrosis. Find our more at Esiason.org and CFF.org.

“Socks for Soldiers” Campaign at St. John University

There are lots of ways to support the troops, from volunteering at your local USO Center to donating basics items like toothbrushes, books, or soap.  One item we often get requests for is socks.  And – as frequent guest blogger Brian Price found out – a seemingly simple everyday item can make a big difference…

PR Students Collect 608 pairs and $1300 for Our Troops
By Brian Price

As the academic school year winds down for students across the country, St. John’s University students are recognizing the thousands of young Americans in the military, posted in combat zones and disaster areas. In appreciation, a St. Johns Public Relations Campaigns Seminar class created a semester-long campaign to collect socks and raise money to buy them.

It began with research, which revealed that our troops frequently run out of clean, dry socks. Some units are deployed where there is no running water, so they can’t even wash them. The students found this quite remarkable. “I can’t believe something we all take for granted is so critical to the comfort of the men and women who make so many sacrifices for us, “ commented Tanya Dainoski, a senior in the class. The students collected socks and donations by holding bake sales and selling refreshments at athletic events. “It was fun and people responded because it is such a good cause,” added Keeley Mangeno, another class member. One of the most successful fundraisers was a pie-throw organized by Jayson Castillo and his fraternity brothers. “We got a lot of cooperation from the faculty, who were willing to suffer the embarrassment of a face full of shaving cream because they knew the money would go to socks for the troops.” Their own professor, Jane Paley, was one of them. “It was fun, though custard would have tasted better!”

The fundraising events culminated in a “Dance Through the Decades” benefit featuring hit music from the fifties to the present. “Something for everyone to dance to,” commented Ashlea Irick, who spent most of the evening on the dance floor.

The University Commons, or UC as it is known on campus, was decorated with American flags and colorful balloons. An extravagant buffet was underwritten, so the students wouldn’t have to spend any of the proceeds. Josh Peters was especially adamant: “We wanted every cent we raised to go to our troops, not to the party.”

The dance attracted classmates, friends and faculty.

Vance Toure is a senior and PR major: “Socks are one of the overlooked necessities for the troops. Tonight’s fundraiser brings the community together in the name of a great cause.”

Clearly the plan worked; big boxes at the entrance to the dance were overflowing with sweat socks.

When 50 students lined up to do the electric slide at the urging of DJ Zeke, who volunteered to spin tunes at the dance, Prof. Mark Prendergast, a Vietnam veteran and former Army Sergeant watched from the sidelines. “St. John’s University is an institution built around the notion service; it’s energizing to see students come out and support the troops regardless of their feelings on the war.”

Dr. John DiMarco, Director of the Undergraduate Public Relations program added: “The lessons of the curriculum educate the students while simultaneously giving back to society.”

The students agree, including Maria Kirsch, a senior and P.R. major: “This class was a great opportunity to give back. I have several family members in active service, so this is event is meaningful on multiple levels.” Amanda Wilkinson, another student in the class, got support for the initiative from both her father and grandfather, both of whom served in the military.

The best part was the fun the students were having celebrating our troops. Student Sydney Cohn stopped dancing just long enough to sum it up:

“A Friday night dance gave students a chance to socialize with the greater result: hundreds of pairs of socks will be donated to the troops.”

If you’d like to find ways for your school or college group to fundraise or have a donation drive for items like socks, please contact your local USO or send us an email. Brian Price is a writer for SNY, the online home for all things NY sports. The opinions expressed in this blog are solely those of Brian Price and do not necessarily reflect those of the USO.

New York Jets Offer Words of Praise and Thanks to the Troops

By Brian Price, Reporter for SNY

The New York Jets have arguably been the most talked about team this off-season. A 2010 trip to the AFC championship, followed by several big off-season moves, and the opening of a new stadium already has the football world talking about a green Super Bowl. Additionally, HBO will be arriving at Jets training camp to feature the team on “Hard Knocks.” But despite all this attention, when it comes to the troops the Jets have remained grounded and humble. They were all eager to take a moment to offer words of thanks and to share some of their own connections to those serving in combat zones and disaster areas.

Jets running back Tony Richardson tells Brian Price about his connection to the military. (Photo courtesy of Ben Leit)

Brian Price: You have several family members in service.
Tony Richardson, #49, FB: Growing up in a military family was the best thing that ever happened to me. My father was a Vietnam veteran and lifelong military man. The little things that he taught me have always stuck with me: if I’m going to do something I’m going to give it 100%. Little things like always making my bed each morning strengthened my character and have carried over to my professional life. From a very young age I was always very disciplined.

My father was a model of consistency. Everyday he was up early, never complained, and his uniform was sharp. He was just the same guy everyday and that taught me a lot about doing things over and over again, but always doing them the right way.

My sister is still in service. She’s at Fort Bragg in North Carolina. She’s the same way and now teaching my nephew the same values.

Sometimes people look at us as being heroes but, and I say it all the time, the troops are America’s true heroes. Without them we couldn’t do our job and live our lives. They lay their lives on the line and are willing to make the ultimate sacrifice for us. That’s what a true hero is.

Richardson’s father, Sergeant Major Ben Richardson, was a career army man. His sister, Shonn, is a Staff Sergeant in the U.S. Army. She’s in line for a promotion to E.A.

Kris Jenkins, #77, DT: My baby brother is part of the air division in Afghanistan. I’m always thinking about him and anybody else who’s serving. I’m just thankful and grateful and I hope they get home safe.

Whatever my biggest problem is, football related or not, it can’t compare to what he’s going through. He’s over there dodging bullets. They call him Goose, but his name is Chance McDaniel. He’s on his third tour so this will be his last one and we’re praying that he gets home safe.

Bart Scott, #57, LB: My father went to Vietnam, so I understand the pain of families and kids who have a loved one overseas. There’s no phrase or words that can be used to thank them enough. All we can do is say thank you and hope they know how much we’re praying for them and how much we appreciate them.

In sports, some say, “We’re going to war.” No. They’re going to war for real. Young men and women, college students, who have bright futures ahead of them and yet they’re willing to pay the ultimate price.

With the war having gone on for some time now people tend to forget because it’s not in the moment. The fact of the matter is there are still men and women over there continuing to fight and die for us. I just hope we get our troops back safely to their families. I appreciate that they’re willing to make a sacrifice that we could never imagine.

Mark Sanchez expresses his gratitude to the Troops with Price. (Photo Courtesy of Ben Leit)

BP: What goes through your mind during the National Anthem?
Mark Sanchez, #6, QB: During warm-ups I’m focused on the game, but it’s during those moments when the anthem is played that I can step away from the game, reflect and appreciate the opportunity to be able to play because of the sacrifices that so many have made.

On behalf of the New York Jets we just want to express our appreciation for our servicemen and women and everything you do for us. We’re with you and thank you for allowing us to have our freedom.

Damien Woody, #67, OT: Hearing the National Anthem is one of the most special moments on game day. Everything that’s happened in history and everything that’s going on today seems to build to that moment. We’re able to play these football games and live out our dreams. We know that while we play a game people are at war. It really makes me emotional in that moment. I’m not just speaking for myself on that. There are a lot of players in this locker room, and many others around in the NFL, who feel the same way.

Trust me, with a lot of family and friends in the service I understand what it takes to do that job. I don’t think I could do it myself. It’s a tough responsibility and it takes a special kind of person to serve. I’m just so appreciative of what they do. I feel privileged to play in the National Football League but a lot of the liberties that I have wouldn’t be possible without the ladies and gentlemen fighting overseas and doing what they do everyday to protect us from foreign combatants.

BP: You’ve spent time with the troops, right?
D’Brickashaw Ferguson, #60, OT: I had a chance to go out to Fort Wainwright in Alaska to speak with men and women of the army. Now I wasn’t on the front but I was on a base. I got a chance to meet not just troops but military families. It was a great opportunity to be face to face with some of the bravest people on earth. I think it was rewarding for them and we went there to show our support but I ended up learning a lot through the experience.

BP: Like what? How was your perspective changed?
DF: There’s still war going on but the news may turn its focus to other things. It’s important to always remain aware that there are still people risking their lives everyday for us whether we hear about it on the news or not.

BP: Do you have some words for our troops?
Calvin Pace, #97, LB: I just want to say thank you. Come home safe. Everybody appreciates what you do by putting your lives on the line, keeping us safe, and keeping us free. God bless.

Ladainian Tomlinson, #21, RB: Look, we’re entertainers that really give the people a chance to enjoy the freedom of watching the game. But from my perspective the troops are the reason we’re able to play this game. What they’re doing is keeping us safe. I maintain my perspective by always keeping an eye on what’s going on with the troops. We’re all so appreciative.

Danny Woodhead, #83, WR: They’re fighting with their lives to defend our country. The troops deserve all the credit they get, and they deserve even more. They can’t be praised enough. We play football and at times it may seem like a big deal but in the grand scheme of things what the troops do is way more important. Thanks for all you do. You make us proud.

Dustin Keller, #81,TE: You sometimes hear an athlete say: “We’re putting our bodies on the line,” or “ we’re going to war.” It’s a game. Our troops put their lives on the line for us. That always has to be appreciated. I have the utmost respect for those in the service.

Shonn Greene, #23, RB: I just appreciate the troops and everything that they do. A lot of people don’t realize how tough it is to be out there. With everybody else back here going about their lives they may not realize it. The troops are greatly appreciated and on behalf of the Jets organization I want to say thank you.

Dwight Lowery, #26, CB: They put their lives on the line for something that’s greater than themselves. We greatly admire and appreciate them. I’m not the type of guy that could go out and do what they do. I have nothing but respect for the troops.

Shaun Ellis, #92, DE: I want to thank the troops for supporting us, having our backs and keeping us safe. God Bless.

David Harris, #52, LB: Their service can’t be measured with words. They put their lives on the line everyday for you and me. We’re all so thankful for the liberties that we have today that the troops provide. Get home safe.

We would like to thank Brian Price of SNY for this post and we’d also like to thank Bruce Speight and the entire Jets front office for their help.