23 Facts for the Army’s 240th Birthday

Department of Defense photo

Department of Defense photo

1. First, the basics: The United States Army as we know it today was founded June 14, 1775, when the First Continental Congress OK’d the enlistment of soldiers to serve the united American colonies.

2. Nearly 70 percent of all Medals of Honor have been awarded to soldiers. And 1,198 of the Army’s 2,403 Medals of Honor were awarded for actions in the Civil War.

3. Hungry, soldier? Well, the Army is looking into 3D printing food.

4. The USO has been helping soldiers since its inception. Here’s one Tuskegee Airman’s story of how a USO tour director helped him in the face of racism.

5. Gen. Martin E. Dempsey is the ninth Army general to serve as Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. That’s more than double any other branch. Dempsey is retiring in 2015.

6. Francis Marion – known as “The Swamp Fox” – headed a group of Revolutionary War-era Army Rangers known as Marion’s Partisans. He is also credited with creating modern guerrilla warfare, which was key to the American victory against the British.

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7. More than half of the men elected President of the United States – 24 to be exact – have worn the Army’s uniform.

8. Pvt. James Buchanan was the only president who served in the Army who didn’t become an officer.

8. June 14 is also Flag Day. Officially adopted in 1916, the first iteration of the American flag was actually authorized by the Second Continental Congress on June 14, 1777.

9. The Army is marginally responsible for inventing the microwave. A World War II engineer at Raytheon realized radiation from radar – which the Army was using to scan for enemy missiles – could be used to heat products, too.

10. Galusha Pennypacker is widely recognized as the youngest general in Army history, earning a promotion to brevet brigadier general at the age of 20 during the Civil War.

11. The Army was the last branch to adopt an official song, declaring “The Army Goes Rolling Along” as its official tune in 1956. (You can download it here.)

12. The USO helps out modern soldiers in a host of ways beyond snacks and a place to snooze. Here’s the story of Army Spc. Austin Hunsinger, who needed help fast to get to his father’s funeral.

An Army CH-47 Chinook helicopter in Bagram, Afghanistan, in 2004. U.S. Army photo

An Army CH-47 Chinook helicopter in Bagram, Afghanistan, in 2004. U.S. Army photo

13. The Army likes to name its helicopters in honor of Native American tribes. Here’s why.

14. The Air Force was part of the Army until 1947.

15. Gen. Henry “Hap” Arnold is the only person to be promoted to the rank of five-star general in two different branches — the Army and the Air Force.

16. The Lewis and Clark Expedition was actually an Army campaign to map and discover the geographic secrets of the continent.

17. Robert E. Lee famously graduated from West Point in 1829 with zero demerits. He’s often given credit for being the only person to pull off the feat. But according to at least one researched column in the Topeka Capital-Journal, Lee actually graduated second in his class behind a man named Charles Mason, who also equaled Lee’s zero demerits feat.

Dwight D. Eisenhower.

Dwight D. Eisenhower.

18. For the sake of comparison, Gen. of the Army Dwight D. Eisenhower graduated with 307 demerits, according to the same story. (He turned out alright, though.)

19. Eisenhower was the last general from any branch to be elected president.

20. It sounds like a conspiracy theory, but it’s true: the Army tested the spread of biological agents on unknowing Americans from the 1940s through the 1960s, inadvertently killing at least one civilian by dispersing what was previously thought to be a harmless bacteria.

21. Bob Neyland graduated West Point in 1916 and is still the baseball team’s all-time leader in pitching victories (35). Neyland was also a boxer and — perhaps most famously — went on to coach the University of Tennessee’s football team. The school’s football stadium is named after him.

22. Speaking of football, Army was once a national power. They won a piece of three straight national championships between 1944 and 1946.

23. The Old Guard still keeps watch over the Tomb of the Unknowns.

Celebrate the U.S. Army’s 240th birthday with us by signing their birthday card.

Our Youngest Donor Ever? 1-Year-Old’s Birthday Celebration Raises Funds to Buy In-Kind Snacks for Troops at USO Osan

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A birthday is a great reason to celebrate — and give back.

That’s exactly why Cherie and Air Force Capt. James Bell, parents of Collette Cruz Bell, decided to ask for donations to USO Osan in lieu of presents at their daughter’s first birthday. The Bells, who live on Osan Air Base, South Korea, raised nearly $100 to donate in Collette’s name, making her one of the youngest USO donors ever.

“My husband and I feel very blessed in that we are able to adequately feed and clothe our daughter,” Cherie Bell wrote in an email interview. “Consequently we thought that donations to the USO would be much better utilized than gifts for her first birthday.”

“We also wanted her to be able to have the memory later on of doing some great for others so that she will hopefully learn the joy in giving.”

Collette’s parents took the money and made an in-kind donation to USO Osan in the form of snacks, drinks and food for troops and their families to enjoy — something the Bell family knows will be appreciated.

“My husband and I have spent countless hours enjoying USO locations in airports and military installations,” Bell wrote. “Donating to the USO was our way of expressing gratitude to an organization that has always been there for us while also teaching our daughter a valuable lesson about giving.”

In addition to asking for donations to the USO for their daughter’s big day, the Bells threw a “Despicable Me”-themed barbecue for their friends, complete with a special banana-and-applesauce cake for Collette. The Bells also made a family trip to the beach as part of the birthday festivities.

Happy (Belated) Birthday, Navy!

Group of Navy men leave the Wailuku USO club for a tour of the scenic sights on Maui. These tours are arranged by USO. WWII era 1942 - 1947 (Photo from USO archives)

We’re so sorry, Navy!  We meant to wish you Happy 235th Birthday yesterday.  Really, we did!  We hope we can make it up to you with this rarely seen vintage photo from WWII.

ADM Gary Roughead, CNO delivered a special message on the US Navy’s Birthday and we wanted to share that with you, too.  Here’s to another great 235 years…

We Want to Hear From You!

Our anniversary is right around the corner: we ‘ll be 69 on February 4th!  And to help celebrate, we’re asking for YOUR USO stories.

Have a recollection about an entertainment tour that changed you life?  A picture from your favorite USO Center?  Or the story about how you met your future spouse at a USO dance?  We’d love to hear them all.

It’s simple: send an email of your USO story to commrequest@uso.org and include any attachments.  We’ll publish some of our favorites all throughout our birthday week on this blog and the On Patrol Blog.

Happy (almost) Birthday to us and we can’t wait to hear from YOU!