Vince Vaughn Treats Troops to an Advance USO Screening of ‘Unfinished Business’

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Giving back to the military is in Vince Vaughn’s blood.

So when he was presented with the chance to treat troops at Edwards Air Force Base, California, to an advance screening of his upcoming film “Unfinished Business,” the three-time USO tour veteran had to say yes.

“I have military in my family,” Vaughn said. “My sister was [in the military], and [I have had] relatives [serve] way back, all the way back to the beginning, I believe, to the revolution.

“I’m always appreciative of the troops and all the sacrifices that are made and it’s always been important to me to express that.”

In addition to meeting with base leadership and personally kicking off the screening event, Vaughn got to chat and take photos with troops who had recently returned home and others who’d been recognized for excellence in their jobs.

“I hope that the movie brings them some laughter, that they have a good day laughing,” Vaughn said. “[I’m glad I] just get the chance to send the message that I know that a lot of people share, which is that they’re always in our minds and in our hearts.”

Vaughn traveled overseas with the USO to screen “Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story” for service members in Southwest Asia in 2004.

“I [had] shot ‘Dodgeball’ and was shooting ‘Wedding Crashers,'” he said. “I had met Pat Tillman and then I got the news … on the TV that he had passed. It really bothered me and I had other friends who were overseas. So, I called the USO out of nowhere and said, ‘Can I come over?’”

The following year, Vaughn continued his USO relationship by screening “Wedding Crashers” for troops. In the past decade, he’s entertained more than 8,735 servicemen and women through the USO.

7 Air Force Facts for the Service’s 67th Birthday

Members from the 36th Airlift Squadron walk Aug. 11 during Red Flag-Alaska at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska. Air Force photo

Members from the 36th Airlift Squadron walk Aug. 11 during Red Flag-Alaska at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska. Air Force photo

As the Air Force celebrates its 67th birthday, here’s seven things you may not know about the most recently formed branch of the U.S. military.

1. The Air Force shares its birthday with the CIA. Both were founded on September 18, 1947.

So, can we come in? A "roof stomp" (which is nowdays often a "porch stomp") at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado. Air Force photo

So, can we come in? A “roof stomp” (which is nowdays often a “porch stomp”) at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado. Air Force photo

2. A “roof stomp” is an Air Force tradition where airmen welcome new commander or celebrate a special occasion by climbing up on the commander’s roof and make noise while others are bang on the windows and doors. The commander then opens the door to welcome in the group for refreshments. (In recent years, some airmen have modified the tradition to a “porch stomp.”)

3. Before the Air Force became its own branch of the military, it was a part of the Army. On Aug. 1, 1907, the U.S. Army Signal Corps formed the Aeronautical Division, which later evolved into the Air Force.

Air Force combat ace Robin Olds and his famous 'stache. Photo via commons

Air Force combat ace Robin Olds and his famous ‘stache. Photo via commons

4. Each March, some airmen participate in a Mustache March, a tradition where airmen grow mustaches to honor Air Force legend and triple ace Brig. Gen. Robin Olds.

5. Johnny Cash, Morgan Freeman and James Stewert are just a handful of the celebrities who have served as airmen. Stewart – who won an Oscar for “Philadelphia Story” before flying missions in World War II and Vietnam – rose to the rank of brigadier general in the Air Force Reserve.

6. In 1947, then-Air Force Capt. Chuck Yeager broke the sound barrier in his Bell X-1 rocket-powered aircraft, beginning a new era of aeronautics in America.

7. Two U.S. presidents — Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush — served as airmen. Reagan’s service came when the branch was still the Army Air Forces. Bush served in the Texas Air National Guard before transferring to the Air Force Reserve.

Jeep Brings USA Basketball Stars Together with Airmen in Las Vegas

Check out these cool shots of members of the USA Basketball Men’s National Team meeting up with troops from United States Air Force last week after practice in Las Vegas.

You can share a photo on Instagram of your favorite summer moment using #jeepsummer and @jeepofficial will donate $1 to the USO.

Video

2013 Warrior Games Highlights

The fourth annual Warrior Games has come to a close in Colorado Springs, and though it was close competition with the Army in every event, the Marines brought home the Chairman’s Cup once again.

“Congratulations to all of the 2013 Warrior Games competitors,” said Charlie Huebner, chief of Paralympics for the U.S. Olympic Committee, during the closing ceremony. “While we celebrate medals, this competition is really an example of how sport can change lives. We hope these service members and veterans don’t stop here. The goal is for them to return home and get involved in sport programs in their communities.”

The competition formally ended Thursday night at the U.S. Air Force Academy in a ceremony honoring the nearly 200 wounded troops and disabled veterans who represented their services in the inaugural Warrior Games.

Troops and veterans from the U.S. and Britain competed in a week-long series of paralympic-type events at the U.S. Olympic Training Center and at the academy. They were challenged as individuals and as teams in shooting, swimming, archery, sitting volleyball, cycling, wheelchair basketball and track and field events.

The USO and all of the volunteers from Colorado were proud to stand by the side of these elite athletes throughout the week of Paralympic competition. Please enjoy this montage of footage from the past week of Warrior Games competition.

–Video and story by Joseph Andrew Lee, USO staff writer

Retroactive Stop Loss Pay: The Air Force Perspective

By Major Eries Gibson, Chief, Air Force Separations and Retirements Branch

Calling all eligible Air Force members, former Air Force members and surviving family members of former Air Force members, we have an incredible opportunity for you to receive $500 for every month you were stop lossed… but the offer is only good until 21 October 2010!

This is not a scam.  This is not a joke. There is no service commitment or recall requirement associated with the money.  The pay is for service already rendered. The only issue is, I need you to apply!  If you think you may be eligible, I need you to come forward and apply for your payout today!

The payout is $500 a month for each month, or portion of the month, you were retained on active duty as a result of service-directed stop loss. The average payout is $3,500. … I repeat, $3,500!

Where does the money come from?  The 2009 War Supplemental Appropriations Act appropriated $534.4M for Retroactive Stop Loss Special Pay for eligible active, Guard, reserve, retired and former service members.   If you were retained on active duty in the Air Force as a result of the service implementing stop loss during Operation Enduring Freedom between 2 October 2001 and 1 August 2002 or Operations Enduring and Iraqi Freedom between 2 May 2003 and 23 Jun 2003, you need to apply for Retroactive Stop Loss Special Pay.

With less than 45 days left to submit claims under this program, I encourage you to apply now if you believe you may be eligible.  If you believe someone you know may be eligible, please “Tell A Friend” and encourage them to apply.  It costs nothing to apply and the process is quick.  While my office oversees the policy for all current and former Airmen, the program is open to all services…I repeat, open to Air Force, Army, Navy and Marines.  The eligibility timeframe for all services is 11 Sep 01 to 30 Sep 09.

Please visit the DoD website today and apply before the program ends on 21 Oct 10: http://www.defense.gov/home/features/2010/0710_stoploss/.

The monthly payout is $500, the average payout is $3,500, and the cost to apply is $0!  Don’t wait, apply today!