Your USO at Work: June 2015 — The USO Looks to Cover Every Angle of the Transition to Civilian Life

USO’s Transition 360 Alliance Combines the ‘Very Best’ to Help Troops Reintegrate into Civilian Life

It’s five nonprofits with one goal: help transitioning troops right now.

Transition StackedThe USO recently announced the formation of the USO Transition 360 Alliance, an initiative that attempts to cover every angle of a military family’s transition into civilian life when troops’ service ends.

We are partnering with Hire Heroes USA, The Comfort Crew for Military Kids, Stronger Families and newcomer RallyPoint/6 (RP/6) to form a comprehensive menu of programming for everyone from new and pending veterans seeking new careers to young military children who are facing yet another move.

“The USO has brought these groups together to combine the very best of what each of us has to offer America’s transitioning military families, on a scale that no single organization could achieve alone,” USO CEO and President J.D. Crouch II said in a release.

While three of the four nonprofits will be familiar to service members who’ve taken advantage of USO programming, the USO says the difference will be the alliance’s ability to work seamlessly to present a holistic approach to military transition.

USO Transition 360 Alliance Partners

Comfort Crew for Military Kids: Supports military kids and teens as they overcome the obstacles unique to growing up in a military family.

Hire Heroes USA: Provides active-duty and wounded, ill and injured troops and their spouses with tools, resources and networking opportunities to meet their career goals.

RP/6: A team of case navigators known as scouts employ a unique concierge approach, creating action plans for the service members and their families to ensure they are supported through a “no wrong door” experience.

Stronger Families: Helps military couples to reconnect and strengthen their relationships by establishing effective ways of communicating and building trust and hope.

Read more about the USO Transition 360 Alliance here.

Female Troops, Military Spouses Get Styled Up at USO Operation That’s My Dress

As a busy mom and public affairs officer in the Navy, Petty Officer 1st Class Bickiana Patton doesn’t have many opportunities to show off her feminine side. But thanks to the USO — and sponsors Sherri Hill, Ann Taylor and Ralph Lauren — Patton was able to let her hair down and enjoy an afternoon of fashion and pampering at USO Operation That’s My Dress at Fleet Week New York 2015.

“I have to admit, it was wonderful,” Patton said. “The USO helped me feel like a diva today.”

Now in its third year, USO Operation That’s My Dress, which normally caters to military teens attending formal events, has expanded to include events for female service members and military spouses.

The afternoon of glitz and glamour kicked off with a performance by the USO Show Troupe and a fashion show featuring professional models and the Miss USA and Miss Teen USA titleholders. After the show, attendees enjoyed hair and makeup demonstrations by professional stylists before heading upstairs to find the perfect dress. Spouses and female service members were even treated to free accessories by JTV jewelry to complete their looks.

Caregivers of Wounded, Ill and Injured Troops Get Lessons in Resiliency at USO Seminar

Angela Brooks, left, chats with another USO Caregivers Seminar attendee at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, last month. USO photo by Sandi Moynihan

Angela Brooks, left, chats with another USO Caregivers Seminar attendee at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, last month. USO photo by Sandi Moynihan

Angela Brooks can’t remember the last time she put herself first.

Between working, taking care of her children and caring for her disabled Air Force veteran husband who struggles with PTSD, there’s little time left at to address her personal needs.

“I literally have the world on my shoulders,” Brooks said. “[Caregivers like me] do a lot and it’s not so much physical anguish, it’s mental anguish, and that’s hard.”

So when Brooks heard Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, was hosting a USO Caregivers Seminar — a day of interactive programming designed to address the immediate needs of those who care for wounded, ill and injured service members — she knew she had to attend.

After participating in the two morning sessions, which featured game on Nation Vice President Blair Bloomston and Stronger Families Executive Director Noel Meador, respectively, Brooks — who’d never attended any type of caregiver-centric programming before — was already glad she came.

“I felt very isolated up until today,” Brooks said. “[But today at the USO Caregivers Seminar] I feel comfortable. I feel safe and I feel like I’m not going to be judged.”

Brooks even felt comfortable enough to share details about her daily challenges with the entire room during a communication activity. Brooks admits she relished in the rare opportunity to talk about being a caretaker with others who are experiencing similar situations.

“I just want to learn more and be open and this environment is very opening and freeing,” Brooks said. “I just really appreciate people thinking of us”

You can help caregivers like Brooks get the support they need by visiting

USO and Sesame Street Debut New Performance Focused On Military-to-Civilian Transition

More than a million troops are expected to leave the military between 2011 and 2016. That’s why the USO and Sesame Street teamed up to help military kids cope with the challenges of transitioning from military to civilian life.

The cast of the Sesame Street/USO Experience for Military Families shakes hands with young audience members. USO Photo by Dave Gatley

The cast of the Sesame Street/USO Experience for Military Families shakes hands with young audience members. USO Photo by Dave Gatley

The organizations are addressing these new realities by debuting a show focused on military-to-civilian transition. The performances of “Katie’s Family Transitions to Civilian Life” are in addition to the already-popular show, “Katie is Moving to a New Base.” Both shows will run as part of the 2015 Sesame Street/USO Experience for Military Families tour, which kicked off on May 7 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska.

“Just as separating from the military can be a challenge for an adult, we knew that that could be a challenging transition for a kid as well,” Rachel Tischler, USO vice president of entertainment, told DOD News.

Sesame Street and the USO know that when one family member serves, the whole family serves. In the new show, military families are taken on a journey as Katie, a character created for the USO, starts a new adventure outside of the military. She makes new friends, keeps in touch with old pals and learns how to talk to her parents about the challenges she’s facing.

“We like to feel it starts a dialogue so kids can then open up even more about what it is they’re going through because they just heard Katie and Elmo talk about it,” Tischler said.

This year, more than 100 performances at 45 military bases in nine countries are scheduled. Click here to see if the 2015 Sesame Street/USO Experience for Military Families is coming to a base near you.

USO and The Grand Ole Opry Salute Troops with an All-Star Concert

The world famous Grand Ole Opry in Nashville welcomed troops and family members last month and treated them to a special red carpet arrival and a star-studded show featuring USO tour veterans Trace Adkins, Kellie Pickler, Craig Morgan and Lee Greenwood.

“I tell people all the time, one of the greatest stages to play on in the world is the Grand Ole Opry stage,” said Morgan, who served in the Army for more than a decade. “The only stage that’s better is the one we’re standing on when we’re in front of the men and women who are serving. Tonight we got to put them both together, so it was extremely special.”

The Opry, which will celebrate its 90th anniversary later this year, partnered with the USO and MusiCorps to honor troops and families during Military Appreciation Month. The show was part of the Opry’s Cause for Applause series, where the musical institution is highlighting causes it believes in.

“I’m very proud that the Opry has decided to get involved on this level with the USO,” said Adkins, who returned from a USO tour to Kuwait, Afghanistan and Germany in time to take part in the Opry concert.

The USO invited troops from Fort Campbell, Kentucky, and the Nashville area to take part in the VIP experience.

“It’s important that our military knows that we love, support and are praying for them,” eight-time USO tour veteran Kellie Pickler told Country Weekly. “We have their backs because they have ours.”

USO Joins Forces With Indian Motorcycle, Zac Brown Band to Support Military

Indian Motorcycle has a proud military history, building bikes for the military during World Wars I and II, so it makes sense that the company would team with the USO to continue its longtime support of our troops.

IndianIndian, America’s first motorcycle company, recently announced a partnership with the USO and donated $100,000 to the organization. It’s also partnering with the Zac Brown Band, which has entertained thousands of troops on its USO tours. The three-time Grammy Award winners will meet with troops on select stops of their 50-city North American concert tour and will also donate tickets to each of their concerts. Indian Motorcycle will distribute the donated tickets to military personnel and first responders.

“We are proud to serve as brand ambassadors for Indian Motorcycle, and are happy to continue supporting the troops through our friends at the USO,” Zac Brown said in a release.

“There is a very natural relationship between Zac Brown Band, Indian Motorcycle, the USO and the military families we all support,” said Steve Menneto, vice president of motorcycles for Polaris Industries. “Bringing the band onboard as a brand ambassador is both a pleasure and a tremendous value for our partners and our rider community.”

Kroger’s Honoring Our Heroes Program Builds on Generosity of Its Customers

Kroger recently announced a robust, multifaceted program involving events and customer engagement that will help honor our military heroes all summer long.

Kroger Co LogoThrough its annual Honoring Our Heroes program, Kroger is inviting its customers to support the USO in multiple ways. Shoppers can give to the USO through register scan cards and coin boxes or by donating online at Kroger will match every donation dollar-for-dollar, up to $1 million.

“Honoring Our Heroes started as a small project in 2010, with coin boxes in 1,200 stores,” said Lynn Marmer, Kroger’s group vice president of corporate affairs. “When we raised $400,000, we knew our customers were as committed to recognizing our troops and their families as we are, and we decided to amplify our effort.”

In addition to donating at stores or online, customers can also purchase special gift cards in $5, $10, and $15 denominations that will be delivered to local USO centers.

Kroger and the USO also teamed up to treat troops and military families to some barbecue. As a token of the company’s appreciation for the many dinners families miss together because of deployments, Kroger hosted Red, White and BBQ events in 10 locations across the United States and three additional celebrations on U.S. bases in Germany and Kuwait.

“While we can never truly thank our service men and women enough for the sacrifices they make, we are deeply committed to recognizing our troops and their families through our partnership with the USO,” Marmer said.

Your USO at Work: November 2014 — USO, Sesame Street Celebrate 500,000 Smiles

The Sesame Street/USO Experience for Military Families celebrated a major milestone with families at Fort Benning, Georgia, on October 3 when the tour entertained its 500,000th military family member. USO photo by Dave Gatley

The Sesame Street/USO Experience for Military Families celebrated a major milestone with families at Fort Benning, Georgia, on October 3 when the tour entertained its 500,000th military family member. USO photo by Dave Gatley

Sesame Street/USO Experience Reaches 500K Milestone

It’s always a sunny day on Sesame Street, but Elmo, Cookie Monster and the Muppets had an extra special reason to sing and dance with all their friends last month. The Sesame Street/USO Experience for Military Families entertained its 500,000th military family member.

“The fact that we hit that particular number is a giant milestone for us,” said Nicole McClendon, tour manager for the USO/Sesame Street Experience for Military Families.

The Sesame Street/USO Experience for Military Families has toured since July 2008 and has taken its message of facing fears and embracing change to more than 500,000 troops and military families. With help from Katie, a military child who is moving to a new place, and all of her friends, the tour has performed more than 893 shows on 147 military installations in 33 states and 11 countries.

“Five hundred thousand represents the number of smiles Elmo and Katie have brought to military kids and their families … as the tour has traveled around the world,” USO President and CEO Dr. J.D. Crouch II said in a release. “We thank our friends at Sesame Street for helping to make this possible and we look forward to seeing many more smiling faces as the tour continues its journey.”

USO’s Every Moment Counts Flag Breaks World Record

The USO's Every Moment Counts flag is displayed at The Great American Ballpark in Cincinnati on Sept. 11. USO photo by Mike Theiler

The USO’s Every Moment Counts flag is displayed at The Great American Ballpark in Cincinnati on Sept. 11. USO photo by Mike Theiler

With signatures gathered from all 50 states and seven countries, USO announced in September that it broke the Guinness World Records title for most signatures on a flag with 115,405 gathered digitally and in-person around the world. The USO shattered the current record set in 2012 by more than 82,132 signatures.

As part of its Every Moment Counts campaign, the USO rallied Americans to show support for troops and their families through the simple act of saying thank you with their signature.

“Every signature on the Every Moment Counts flag is a symbol of a grateful nation’s appreciation for all that our men and women in uniform and their families do for us on a daily basis,” said J.D. Crouch II, USO President and CEO.

Go to to show your appreciation for our troops and their families.

Al Roker Sets Weather Forecast Record in Support of the USO

With six minutes to go in #Rokerthon, the expression momentarily drained from Al Roker’s face as his co-anchors piled into his small New York City studio.

NBC's Al Roker headlined the "Today"/USO Comedy Tour in Afghanistan in October. USO photo by Fred Greaves

NBC’s Al Roker headlined the “Today”/USO Comedy Tour in Afghanistan in October. USO photo by Fred Greaves

“I don’t think there are enough people in here,” Roker deadpanned. More than 33 hours  — and despite several jokes suggesting the contrary — he was still lucid.

And then he delivered more temperatures.

Roker, a USO tour veteran, set a Guinness World Record on Nov. 14 for the longest continuous televised weather forecast at 34 hours. He did it to raise awareness for the USO, asking a national audience, a litany of NBC affiliates and livestream viewers to visit his still-active Crowdrise page, where he raised more than $75,000 for the organization by the time he went off the air.

He had a lot of help while he was on the air, too. #Rokerthon was often the No. 1 trending topic on Twitter, with thousands of viewers (including USO centers around the world) tweeting in questions about the weather to keep Roker’s forecasting streak alive.

USO, Renovating Hope and Gary Sinise Foundation Repair Home of Wounded Vet

After returning from Afghanistan with PTSD and a traumatic brain injury, medically retired Army Nurse Corps officer Jim Gardon came home to a surprise.

Unfortunately it wasn’t the good kind.

“When Jim was deployed to Afghanistan, I hired a contractor to remodel the back two rooms of the house,” said his wife Cece Gardon. “He came in, pulled out the electricity, did a haphazard job of sheet rocking and left and never came back.”

Stuck with a huge bill for incomplete work, they didn’t have the money to invest in the project a second time. The USO introduced the Gardons to Paul Hoffecker, the CEO of Renovating Hope, after Cece attended a USO Caregivers Conference. Renovating Hope secured grants from the USO and the Gary Sinise Foundation to make sure the job could be completed once and for all.

“The USO has been better than the 15 different medications the VA has tried to improve my attitude,” Jim Gardon said. “This is something that actually physically, emotionally and socially helps the soldier.”

Visit to learn how you can support our healing heroes and their families.

USO Supports Fort Drum Spouse Through Deployment – and Homecoming

Ashley Sandgren

Ashley Sandgren

Ashley Sandgren’s smiles said as much as her words. Sometimes anxious. Other times confident.

Either way, she knew her wait was almost over.

Just 24 hours away from reuniting with her husband, Army Sgt. Jeremy Sandgren, after his nine-month deployment to Afghanistan, the Virginia native talked through the emotions of what it was like to wait out the couple’s first overseas deployment.

“I think putting it out of your mind is helpful in some sense, but you shouldn’t live your life in denial that they’re in danger, because they are,” she said.

Not that she didn’t have plenty to do. A trained cosmetologist, Sandgren balanced her work with coordinating a family readiness group at Fort Drum, N.Y., and volunteering with the USO, where many Fort Drum spouses have found a home away from home while their significant others were deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan over the past decade.

“I think this USO has such a huge heart,” Sandgren said. “I think it’s extremely important to have the community and the different groups to lean on when your soldier’s deployed. It helps in the sense that you realize that you’re not alone.”

BNSF Helps the USO Support Transitioning Veterans with a Landmark Donation

Job searches are never easy. The task can be even more daunting for veterans looking to land their first civilian position.

That’s where the USO and supporters like the BNSF Railway Foundation step in.

On July 24, the BNSF Railway Foundation announced a $3 million pledge to support USO Warrior and Family Care employment programs for active-duty troops transitioning out of the military. The first-of-its-kind, three-year pledge will fund USO programs designed to assist transitioning troops – including those who are wounded, ill or injured – entering the civilian workforce.

Former Army Officer Makes a Difference for USO, Troops

USO Houston Center Director Liz Vallette

USO Houston Center Director Liz Vallette

USO Houston Center Director Liz Vallette understands what it’s like to be far from home.

With a tour in South Korea and a deployment to Iraq, the former Army officer and West Point graduate also knows that the USO is able to deliver a piece of home to deployed troops around the world.

“I was eager to join an organization that I had directly benefited from during my service, from relaxing in airport USO centers … to enjoying a touch of home from entertainers,” said Vallette, who started with the organization in 2011.

She arrived at USO Houston after serving six years in the Army and another two working with an economic development group in Afghanistan. Having daily opportunities to positively impact the lives of troops and their families was a driving factor in her decision and working with outstanding, motivated colleagues is an added benefit, she said.

Under Vallette’s leadership, USO Houston is piloting innovative programs that connect transitioning troops and their families with high-profile companies in the city’s booming industries. Oil and Gas 101 – a free, two-day orientation to the oil and gas industry – helped troops network directly with Houston-area hiring managers. Vallette and her team are planning another session for 2015 and hope to help more troops prepare for life after the military.

Go to to support our nation’s transitioning troops and their families.

Sesame Street / USO Experience for Military Families Cast Members Share Their Favorite Tour Memories

Grover, Cookie Monster, Katie, Elmo, Honker and  Rosita sing and dance for service members and their kids during The Sesame Street/USO Experience for Military Families which kicked off April 7, 2012 at Scott Air Force Base. (USO photo by Fred Greaves)

Grover, Cookie Monster, Katie, Elmo, Honker and Rosita entertain service members and their kids during The Sesame Street/USO Experience for Military Families on April 7, 2012 at Scott Air Force Base. (USO photo by Fred Greaves)

Since 2008, the Sesame Street/USO Experience for Military Families tour has made unforgettable memories for military children and their families all around the world. The longest-running annual USO tour has delivered moments to hundreds of thousands of military children and their parents through more than 735 shows at more than 144 military bases in 11 countries.

In the spirit of the USO’s Every Moment Counts campaign — and in preparation for entertaining the tour’s 500,000th audience member — members of the 2014 cast and crew shares some their favorite Sesame Street/USO Experience memories.

Here’s just a small sample of the amazing stories they had to tell:

“My favorite moment actually happened in Spain. … A little girl came up, she gave me a picture to give to Elmo. I brought it backstage, gave it to Elmo, and the picture said, ‘Thank you Elmo for coming all the way across the sea to Spain, just to see me.’ And I think it really brought home exactly how important it is for these kids to see this show.” — Stephanie Harmon, performance director

“I have many favorite moments, but one that happens every single day [is] when hundreds of kids and parents walk out with huge smiles on their faces, holding onto their Elmo spinning lights, telling me how much they enjoyed the show, and they constantly say thank you to me. Its a stream of ‘thank you’s. And since I think the show is our way of saying thank you to those same military families, it’s great to just get that cycle of thank you.” — Nicole McClendon, tour manager

Want to learn more about the Sesame Street/USO Experience for Military Families or see if a show is coming near you? Find out more here.

With Parents Deployed, Military Toddlers Confront Monsters

He’s the baby on the block, but he already knows his A, B, C’s; his 1, 2, 3’s; and his Do-re-mi’s. He’s perpetually turned 3-and-a-half for nearly 20 years, but he’s still “got new shoes.”

For toddlers, he’s an A-List celebrity. For parents, he’s nothing short of a red felt superhero.

Elmo is back with the Sesame Street gang in the USO’s longest-running traveling show and the first-ever designed specifically for military families.

The Rood family and the Mowry family got a chance to meet the whole gang back stage, May 16, at the Wallace Theater on Ft. Belvoir. USO photo by Joseph Andrew Lee

Families like the Roods, who saw the Sesame Street/USO Experience at Fort Belvoir just three weeks before moving to a new duty station. Their 2-year-old son Deyvian may be too young to absorb what’s happening, but his older brother, 4-year-old Marques, will have to make new friends for the first time.

“I think it’s pretty cool how they incorporated a new character to talk about relocation,” said Army Staff Sgt. Jeffrey Rood, who came with his two sons and his wife, Kimberly, to see the show May 14 at the Wallace Theater.

Make no mistake—Marques and Deyvian are both diehard Elmo fans. But they might find they have a lot in common with the new kid on Sesame Street.  Her name is Katie, and she’s a 6-year-old military child moving to a new place. She is confronted with the same concerns of today’s real life military families like the Roods—the separation and anxiety of a deployment, and the stress of packing up every few years and relocating to a new base, a new city or a new country.

Ella Terry, 5-year-old daughter of Navy LCDR Ronald Terry, connects with Sesame Street character Katie, a 6-year-old girl who understands what it’s like to move to a new duty station. USO photo by Joseph Andrew Lee

Ella Terry is just 5 years old, and she likes that “Katie had a daddy in the military too.”

“I am a military child and you are a military spout (spouse),” she said, pointing to her mom, Beth, wife of Navy LCDR Ronald Terry.

“Ella has already moved from Maine to San Diego to Washington D.C. in just her first 15 months of life,” said Beth Terry. “And though the transitions were great and she had no idea it was happening, in a couple years we will move again, and I appreciate being able to remind her of Katie.”

Army Staff Sgt. Ryan Mowry is currently deployed to Afghanistan. His 2-year-old daughter, Keirah, attended the show with her mom, Crystal. At night, Keirah dances with her Rock and Roll Elmo doll and spins around giggling every time she hears him laugh. Her mom recalls doing the same thing when she was young.

“I remember learning so much from Sesame Street,” Crystal said. “Now, being able to watch her enjoy and grow up with the same characters, it is just incredible.”

Before the show, the Mowrys and the Roods had the chance to actually meet Elmo, Katie and the whole gang face to face. After her one-on-one with the not-so little red monster, Keirah was elated.

When asked what her deployed daddy would think about her meeting Elmo, her jubilation quickly subsided and her brows began knitting. She responded quietly, staring down at her feet.

“Daddy’s far, far away for work,” she said. ~ Story and photos by Joseph Andrew Lee, USO Staff Writer


The Sesame Street/USO Experience for Military Families tour has performed more than 371 shows on 115 installations in 33 states and 12 countries – lifting the spirits of 222,000+ military families. Tour dates, character bios and tour information can be found at

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The Sesame Street/USO Experience for Military Families 2012

New character Katie tells her friends she is moving during the 2011 Joining Forces: Sesame Street/USO Special Event. USO Photo by Fred Greaves

The Sesame Street/USO Experience for Military Families – a free, traveling USO tour based on Sesame Workshop’s award winning Talk, Listen, Connect initiative – made its debut in July 2008 to help families deal with the unique challenges children of military parents face. For almost four years the tour has visited multiple states and countries, spreading their messages to troops and their families.

The tour is heading back out to the United States this April with some new wheels! The half-hour show focuses on the challenges of deployments and their impact on military kids. During the performance, Elmo and his Sesame pals will help Katie – a military friend relocating to a new place – open up about her fears and excitement in dealing with change and making new friends.  Created exclusively for this tour, Katie was first introduced last April by First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Biden at a Joining Forces rally in Ohio.

But before these fuzzy, furry monsters get on their way, Sesame Street and the USO are reaching out to their fans via Facebook for help naming their new tour bus! Visit to submit ideas for bus names and be sure to stay tuned to for voting on the top picks!

Stop by to learn more and see where the tour is heading next!

Finding Katie

After attending Wednesday’s rehearsal of the Sesame Street/USO Military Family Experience kickoff event in Columbus, Ohio, I was thinking about the genius of the Sesame Street developers who created ‘Katie,’ the new character who tells Elmo during the program that her military family has to move, once again, to another base.

Since the character says so much about what children of our service members have endured since September 11, 2001, I set out at Thursday’s event to find a real  ‘Katie,’ who is living the story that Sesame Street has so vividly created for military kids, as well as children who may not realize why some of their friends have to move away.  After about 90 minutes of searching inside the Franklin County Veterans Memorial auditorium, I came across little Isabella Haas.

Maj John Haas and his daughter Isabella, 3, wait for the kick off of the fifth installment of The Sesame Street/USO Experience for Military Families at the Franklin County Veterans Memorial in Columbus, Ohio April 14, 2011. (USO Photo by Fred Greaves)

Maj John Haas and his daughter Isabella, 3, wait for the kick off of the fifth installment of The Sesame Street/USO Experience for Military Families at the Franklin County Veterans Memorial in Columbus, Ohio April 14, 2011. (USO Photo by Fred Greaves)

As Isabella awaited the appearance of her favorite Sesame character, Elmo, her father, Army Maj. John Haas, told me that she had just celebrated her third birthday the day before the special performance in Columbus.  Maj. Haas and his wife, Dawnann, also planned on enjoying the day with their daughter, because soon, the soldier will be headed to Afghanistan, where he will spend 270 days apart from his little girl.

When I asked Maj. Haas what it will be like spending so much time away from his wife and child, he visibly shuddered, graciously deferring to his spouse to answer a very emotional question.

“We have the Sesame Street book,” Mrs. Haas said, referring to ‘Talk, Listen, Connect,’ which was handed out for free at the performance to help kids cope with deployments, homecomings, and changes, and also includes DVDs.  “We’re also making a cut-out of dad for her to hug, putting her daddy’s voice in a recorded storybook, and figuring out how to use Skype, even though he’ll be in an area that doesn’t have much internet access.”

In addition to Sesame Street, the USO, and the Joining Forces program, Mrs. Haas is channeling other important resources to help her and Isabella cope with the difficulties of the near future.  Maj. Haas’ three brothers are also in the military, and one may still be deployed in Afghanistan when her husband arrives.  Mrs. Haas said she plans to lean on her sisters-in-law, as well as another important force in her family’s life.

“Faith will get me through,” she said.  “The hardest part is Isabella — she’s old enough to know he’s gone, but not old enough to understand.”

When Katie explained to Elmo, Cookie Monster, Grover, and Honker that she has tough days ahead, perhaps little Isabella could relate.  Maybe by watching Katie, it helped Isabella realize that her daddy isn’t leaving because he wants to, or because he doesn’t love her.  It’s because he’s a hero, and this is what heroes do.

Isabella wasn’t the only ‘Katie’ in the audience.  ‘Katie’ is every child who has seen their mommy or daddy leave for a faraway land, or moved with their parents to unfamiliar places around the world.

A few minutes before the performance, Sesame Street and the USO gave little Isabella Haas, sitting on the lap of her soldier dad, an autographed picture of all the characters in the show, including her favorite, Elmo.  “To Isabella, we love you,” a character wrote.

For 270 difficult days, that picture will hopefully remind Isabella of a day she laughed and smiled together with her mom and dad.  With so much love surrounding this child, I have to believe that even better days are still to come.