Milestone: Sesame Street/USO Experience for Military Families Entertains its 500,000th Military Family Member

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FORT BENNING, Georgia—It’s always a sunny day on Sesame Street. But Friday, Elmo, Cookie Monster and the Muppets had an extra special reason to sing and dance with all their friends: The Sesame Street/USO Experience for Military Families entertained its 500,000th military family member.

“The fact that we hit that particular number is a giant milestone for us,” said Nicole McClendon, tour manager for the USO/Sesame Street Experience for Military Families. “It was just so amazing to be able to work so closely with everyone here at Fort Benning to make this moment so special.”

To commemorate the milestone, Elmo and his Muppet friends posed with the audience for a commemorative photograph after their performance. Audience members also received a special cookie to take home with them in addition to other Sesame Street/USO tour goodies.

“I might have told them that they came from Cookie Monster, but [assured the kids] he didn’t eat them [all] before the show,” McClendon said.

Since 2008, this longest-running annual USO tour has delivered memorable moments to hundreds of thousands of military children and their parents through more than 735 shows at more than 140 military bases in 11 countries.

“Five hundred thousand represents the number of smiles Elmo and Katie have brought to military kids and their families … as the tour has traveled around the world,” USO President and CEO Dr. J.D. Crouch II said in a release. “We thank our friends at Sesame Street for helping to make this possible and we look forward to seeing many more smiling faces as the tour continues its journey.”

Roker, Leno and Team of Celebrities Bring Laughs to Troops in Afghanistan on NBC’s “Today”

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Editor’s note: Tune in to Wednesday’s edition of NBC’s “Today” to see the highlights of the “Today”/USO Comedy Tour stage show put on exclusively for troops at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan.

Even in a war zone, Jay Leno can get a laugh.

“Afghanistan looks like Van Nuys but with less gunfire,” the former host of “The Tonight Show” cracked during one of several “Today” live shots from Afghanistan on Wednesday.

Al Roker — a co-host of NBC’s long-running morning show – brought Leno, comedians Craig Robinson and Iliza Shlesinger and musician Kevin Eubanks to Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, for the “Today”/USO Comedy Tour to entertain American troops. The tour is part of the Shine A Light series on “Today.”

Roker is also raising money for the USO through Crowdrise as part of the Shine A Light effort.

“The USO brings entertainment and a bit of levity to a very stressful situation,” Shlesinger said during a “Today” segment. “[J]ust to get a chance to share this with [troops] for just a couple minutes, it’s such an honor.”

While the entertainers did a series of live segments on Wednesday’s broadcast, the highlights of their comedy/variety show for the troops at Bagram will be rebroadcast on NBC on Oct. 7.

“It’s been overwhelming just to be able to look the soldiers in the eye and say thank you to them,” Robinson said. “And they’ve been so grateful that we’re here. It’s really crazy.”

3 Drops of Knowledge: Numbers About the USO on National Coffee Day

Eight ounces of water flows through a K-Cup in Kandahar. A bag of Boca Java gets ripped open near the Pentagon. A sip of Starbucks hits a weary traveler’s lips in a stateside airport.

For 73 years, the USO has been by the side of America’s troops and their families. And that often results in offering them a cup of coffee. On National Coffee Day, here are three numbers to know involving the USO’s coffee distribution.

4,936

That’s how many pounds of coffee Starbucks donates to USO locations in the Mideast so far this year. When you add in the 4,600 K-Cups and 400 VIA instant coffee packets, that’s 11,850 cups of just donated Starbucks coffee for troops downrange to date this year, not including the other in-kind donations those locations receive.

1,440

That’s the number of coffee makers the USO2GO program has shipped troops at remote locations across the globe over the eight year’s of the program’s existence. These USO-in-a-box-style shipments also include 100 pounds of coffee upon request. They may not have many comforts of home, but thanks to the modern marvel of shipping (and airdrops), they have the ability to make a cup of joe.

4

The number of continents where the USO currently serves coffee: North America, Asia, Europe and Africa. It’ll be five, soon (we’re looking at you, Australia).

The Words Behind the Record: What People Said About Signing the USO Every Moment Counts Flag

A word cloud based on the responses of nearly 500 people who signed the USO's Every Moment Counts flag.

A word cloud based on the responses of nearly 500 people who signed the USO’s Every Moment Counts flag.

Country. Served. Proud.

These are just some of the words that appeared most in an unscientific analysis of nearly 500 Every Moment Counts flag signers who shared their reasoning with us. The USO campaign earlier this year broke the Guinness World Record for most signatures on a flag with 115,405.

The flag will have a prominent place this weekend at Dover International Speedway during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series AAA 400. It was officially unveiled at the Great American Ballpark in Cincinnati on Sept. 11, and again Sept. 13 at Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, Massachusetts.

Here are a few of the hundreds of responses the we we received when we asked online signers to tell us why they put their names on the flag:

  • “[We signed] to be a part of history. To honor our military, both present and past.” -Mike and Sharai Coffey
  • “[I signed] for my dad, who can’t. He died in 2005, was the last WWII vet in our small town.” -Nikki Jennings
  • “As a veteran, I can’t begin to count the times the USO was there when I needed them. This was one small way to show current and future veterans that we once served and always serve! God bless the U.S. Armed Forces!” -Donald Cota

(Editors note: Submissions lightly edited for style)

Tastykake and the USO Make a Moment for an Army National Guard Family at a Phillies Game

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At the USO, we’re lucky to have corporate partners who are as dedicated to making moments happen for troops and families as we are. On Sept. 8, that turned into a special night at Citizens Bank Park for one Army National Guard family.

In conjunction with Tastykake’s centennial celebration, the company is partnering with the USO to deliver 100 Birthday Moments to troops and their families as part of the USO’s Every Moment Counts campaign. For the Sept. 8 moment, birthday boy Liam Evans (who turned 7 on Sept. 7) got to throw out the first pitch before the Phillies-Pirates game while his parents, Chief Warrant Officer 3 Reece Evans and Chief Warrant Officer 3 Emily Evans — both Army National Guard members — and his brother Reece looked on.

The USO extends our thanks Tastykake for making this moment for troops and our congratulations the whole Evans family on their big night at the park.

7 Air Force Facts for the Service’s 67th Birthday

Members from the 36th Airlift Squadron walk Aug. 11 during Red Flag-Alaska at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska. Air Force photo

Members from the 36th Airlift Squadron walk Aug. 11 during Red Flag-Alaska at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska. Air Force photo

As the Air Force celebrates its 67th birthday, here’s seven things you may not know about the most recently formed branch of the U.S. military.

1. The Air Force shares its birthday with the CIA. Both were founded on September 18, 1947.

So, can we come in? A "roof stomp" (which is nowdays often a "porch stomp") at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado. Air Force photo

So, can we come in? A “roof stomp” (which is nowdays often a “porch stomp”) at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado. Air Force photo

2. A “roof stomp” is an Air Force tradition where airmen welcome new commander or celebrate a special occasion by climbing up on the commander’s roof and make noise while others are bang on the windows and doors. The commander then opens the door to welcome in the group for refreshments. (In recent years, some airmen have modified the tradition to a “porch stomp.”)

3. Before the Air Force became its own branch of the military, it was a part of the Army. On Aug. 1, 1907, the U.S. Army Signal Corps formed the Aeronautical Division, which later evolved into the Air Force.

Air Force combat ace Robin Olds and his famous 'stache. Photo via commons

Air Force combat ace Robin Olds and his famous ‘stache. Photo via commons

4. Each March, some airmen participate in a Mustache March, a tradition where airmen grow mustaches to honor Air Force legend and triple ace Brig. Gen. Robin Olds.

5. Johnny Cash, Morgan Freeman and James Stewert are just a handful of the celebrities who have served as airmen. Stewart – who won an Oscar for “Philadelphia Story” before flying missions in World War II and Vietnam – rose to the rank of brigadier general in the Air Force Reserve.

6. In 1947, then-Air Force Capt. Chuck Yeager broke the sound barrier in his Bell X-1 rocket-powered aircraft, beginning a new era of aeronautics in America.

7. Two U.S. presidents — Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush — served as airmen. Reagan’s service came when the branch was still the Army Air Forces. Bush served in the Texas Air National Guard before transferring to the Air Force Reserve.